Browsing: History

Reviewing history in the military, the Air Force and triumphs and misadventures in airpower. If you pick up a copy of this week’s Air Force Times, you will also receive a Military Times’ special edition paper commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg. On July 1, 1863,  one of the biggest battles of the Civil War had begun. Check out their coverage through photos, videos and more at militarytimes.com/gettysburg.

Now that the Supreme Court has ruled the Defense of Marriage Act has been ruled is unconstitutional, Air Force Times is looking at how things will change for airmen. In this week’s edition, we tell you how the Supreme Court’s ruling will affect housing, health care and other issues for gay and lesbian airmen. Also this week, the selection rate for technical sergeants has plummeted to its lowest point in years. Air Force Times examines what has caused this promotion logjam and what it means for staff sergeants and senior airmen. In the category of “news you can use,” the…

Now that the Supreme Court has ruled the Defense of Marriage Act has been ruled is unconstitutional, Air Force Times is looking at how things will change for airmen. In this week’s edition, we tell you how the Supreme Court’s ruling will affect housing, health care and other issues for gay and lesbian airmen. Also this week, the selection rate for technical sergeants has plummeted to its lowest point in years. Air Force Times examines what has caused this promotion logjam and what it means for staff sergeants and senior airmen. In the category of “news you can use,” the…

Taking our “Here’s Why” from the paper to the blog. An explanation for why something is the way it is in the Air Force/military. The façade of the Supreme Court. The Taj Mahal. The Leaning Tower of Pisa. All iconic landmarks. All composed of marble. An iconic building to military personnel and the world’s largest office building — the Pentagon — could have been made out of marble, but building planners said, “No way.” Why? According to the Pentagon tours website, the Pentagon has no marble because “it was built during World War II, and Italy, the source of marble, was…

Something as simple as a T-shirt has a military connection. And this year, it celebrates its 100th birthday. In 1913, the U.S. Navy was the first military branch to issue the T-shirt to be worn under uniforms. By WWII, it became standard issue for both the Navy and the Army. Labeled as “underclothing,” it eventually became acceptable for soldiers to remove their dress shirt while working in hot climates, wearing nothing but their uniform pants and a T-shirt. While the public didn’t love that idea at first, more and more people embraced T-shirts when new designs and colors emerged in…

Reviewing history in the military, the Air Force and triumphs and misadventures in airpower. From our friends at Intercepts: On June 3, 1959, the U.S. Air Force Academy graduated its first class of 207 officers. Here is the USAF’s “factsheet”on it’s Academy in Colorado Springs, CO. Below, is a wonderful historical video covering the graduation; it’s approx. 13 mins: Continue on for more fast facts on the ’59 graduating class from Association of Graduates, United States Air Force Academy.

Taking our “Here’s Why” from the paper to the blog. An explanation for why something is the way it is in the Air Force/military. Use a parachute? There’s a club for that. Burned during battle? There’s a club for that. Walk back from behind enemy lines? No worries, there’s a club for that too. Wonder why? Like secret societies, troops from Allied armies formed several, somewhat exclusive clubs to show one another “they made it.” Author Cate Lineberry writes that although these clubs were unofficial, hundreds participated. And they had proof. According to Lineberry, there was the Caterpillar Club, the…

Reviewing history in the military, the Air Force and triumphs and misadventures in airpower. Amelia Earhart is a name many have heard in the classroom and beyond. A pioneer of American aviation, Earhart set off for her transatlantic solo flight on the morning of May 20, 1932. She flew from Newfoundland and landed in Ireland in under 15 hours the next day. Earhart traveled over 2,000 miles in a Lockheed Vega 5B during the trip. Although she wasn’t the first — American aviator Charles Lindbergh became the first pilot to accomplish the nonstop flight across the Atlantic Ocean in 1927…

Reviewing history in the military, the Air Force and triumphs and misadventures in airpower. “Oh the humanity.” Many recall Herb Morrison’s frantic radio broadcast that led people to lose faith in the airship era for a brief time. Even after more than 30 successful transatlantic trips, Morrison painted a vivid picture of the Hindenburg explosion, which occurred May 6, 1937. A team of experts identified the mysterious cause behind its demise 76 years later: static electricity combined with a hydrogen leak. The Public Domain Review compiled this video to show the successful trips the German passenger airship made just before…

Talk about long-lost treasure. John Dodds, a retired member of the Air Force reserve, and his daughter were shopping around a Goodwill thrift store in Washington, D.C. when his daughter spotted something Dodds was pretty familiar with: a WWII bomber jacket. Dodds purchased the jacket, labeled “Robert G. Arand” for $17, and 24 hours later was on the phone with the jacket’s owner, first reported by Stars and Stripes. Arand, a former B-24 pilot who flew more than 40 missions in the South Pacific, hadn’t seen the jacket for more than 60 years. He believes his wife donated the jacket…

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